Evolution of safety
Omnibus Magazine

Evolution of safety

Safety first.

From the Anti-Lock Braking System to the new Active Brake Assist 4 and Sideguard Assist – nearly all modern safety and assistance systems originate from Mercedes-Benz. They are part of an integral safety concept.

Wherever they are going, the driver and passengers are in good hands in a Mercedes-Benz bus or coach. That applies no matter whether the journey is only a short stretch through the city to the workplace or school or a holiday trip in a coach covering thousands of kilometres on motorways through-out Europe. Maximum safety belongs to the core of the Mercedes-Benz brand. That is why Mercedes-Benz has been helping bus and coach drivers for years with increasingly varied and effective assistance systems – and, at the same time, thus provides the best possible protection for all passengers and other road users. Active safety to prevent accidents takes centre stage.

The Anti-lock Braking System in 1981; the Electropneumatic Braking System in 1997; the Adaptive Cruise Control, the Electronic Stability Programme, the Lane Assist and the Continuous Braking Limiter in the last decade; and the Active Brake Assist in increasingly effective and advanced versions – nearly all modern assistance systems first appeared in a bus or coach with the three-pointed star.

Safety at Mercedes-Benz does not only consist of individual measures, however; behind them lies a comprehensive integral safety concept. The claim associated with this is clearly formulated: the premium brand wants to fulfil the highest safety requirements and drives the development towards this across all areas. The integral safety concept is made up of several building blocks. At the centre is a variety of innovative safety equipment specific to the vehicle and use, with the aim of continuously increasing active and passive safety. This includes, for instance, safe driving, deployment in case of danger, the mitigation of the results of an accident and the provision of guidelines for emergency services.

“Mercedes-Benz buses and coaches offer a maximum of safety”

Gustav Tuschen, Head of Product Engineering at Daimler Buses

This includes, among other things, further measures such as OMNIplus driver training. Drivers should be able to recognise dangers in good time and avoid them. They are also expected to react correctly in case of an accident. Even passenger information about handling safety equipment on board – starting with putting the seat belt on in a coach – is part of the concept. It goes far beyond this, however, and includes responsible vehicle maintenance and the use of verified original spare parts during servicing. The target of the integral safety concept is ambitious: turning the vision of accident-free driving into reality.

Exemplary for another major steps towards this is the Mercedes-Benz Tourismo coach as a driver of safety innovation. Its standard equipment includes a number of safetyrelevant components. New to these are the standard new Active Brake Assist 4 (ABA 4) with pedestrian detection and, as an option, the Sideguard Assist as a turning assistant. The current Mercedes-Benz Tourismo Safety Coach demonstrates and characterises the state of safety technology for coaches worldwide.

The safety level of the Mercedes-Benz Citaro bus also acts as a role model. As the world’s first low-floor bus, the Electronic Stability Programme (ESP®) was introduced as an option for the Citaro back in 2011. The Citaro G articulated bus even features the Articulation Turntable Controller (ATC), which works in a similar way to an ESP®. This has now been followed by the Preventive Brake Assist, the world’s first active brake assistant for buses, and the Sideguard Assist, the first the first turning assistant.

All this makes Mercedes-Benz buses and coaches true safety experts. On this point too, they always show off an extra star. Mercedes-Benz wishes you a pleasant and, above all, safe journey – wherever you are going.

1981

1981

ABS (Anti-Lock Braking System): Prevents the wheels from locking during braking

1986

1986

ASR (Acceleration Skid Control): Prevents the wheels from spinning when setting off

1991

1991

All-round brake discs: Improved braking and less fading

ECE R66 EU directive for rollover protection: Protects the survival space for passengers

1997

1997

EBS (Electropneumatic Braking System) with all-round brake discs: Ensures best response times for the foot brake

1999

1999

Integral wing mirror with integrated reversing aid: Helps the driver when manoeuvring by warning when approaching an obstacle

2002

2002

ESP® (coach) Electronic Stability Programme: Stabilises the vehicle in critical driving situations by means of targeted brake intervention

2003

2003

BAS (Brake Assist): Activates the maximum brake pressure when the need for emergency braking is detected

2004

2004

DBL (Continuous Braking Limiter): Prevents the maximum speed from being exceeded when going downhill

ART (Adaptive Cruise Control): Automatically controls the required distance to the vehicles in front

SPA (Lane Assist): Warns against unintentionally leaving the lane

2008

2008

Rain/light sensor: Automatically switches lights/ headlights on

Static cornering light: Optimally illuminates bends

ABA 1 (Active Brake Assist 1): Emergency braking in case of vehicles driving slower in front

FCG (Front Collision Guard): Protects driver/passenger in case of a front collision

2011

2011

ESP® (bus) Electronic Stability Programme: Stabilises the vehicle in critical driving situations by means of targeted brake intervention

ECE R29/pendulum impact Satisfied requirements of the pendulum impact test (compliance): Improved strength of the front cab

Crash element: Protects the driver in case of a front collision

2012

2012

ABA 2 (Active Brake Assist 2): Triggers braking manoeuvre also for stationary obstacles

AtAs (Attention Assist): Warns the driver when tired

2014

2014

AEBS (Advanced Emergency Braking System): Exceeds the current statutory requirements

ABA 3 (Active Brake Assist 3): Emergency braking for stationary obstacles

Stop-and-Go Assist traffic jam assistant: Enables fatigue-free driving in traffic jams

2014

2014

ATC (Articulation Turntable Controller): Stabilises articulated buses in critical driving situations similar to ESP®

TPM (Tyre Pressure Monitoring): Constantly monitors tyre pressure

2015

2015

LED headlights:
Help to stop the driver’s eyes getting tired and deliver an almost constantly high luminous flux over the entire service life

2018

2018

Preventive Brake Assist: Warns in case of a pending collision with pedestrians, vehicles in front or stationary objects and triggers partial braking

Sideguard Assist Turning assistant: Warns in case of stationary/ moving objects at the side of the bus

2018

2018

ABA 4 with pedestrian detection: Active Brake Assist 4 Partial braking also for pedestrians